This Week's Program: Wednesday, June 27, 2012

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Free distribution and airplay for Pacifica Affliates interested in worldwide Indigenous affairs for the week of June 28th - July 5th 2012
STORY ONE:
SOURCE: Indigenous Peoples Issues and Resources (www.indigenouspeoplesissues.com)
In the Pacific Islands

Maori Television is increasing its broadcast hours to focus on language revitalisation and scrapping infomercials in the process - a move which has been praised by a language critic.
From Sunday, the station will broadcast tuition programmes from 10am to 3pm, replacing infomercials which brought in about $250,000a year.
STORY TWO:
SOURCE: SAVE RIVERS saveriversnet.blogspot.com/
Sarawak: More People From Baram Voiced Opposition To The Proposed Baram Dam
IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

Sarawak, Maylasia - More than 200 people from Baram District as well as supporters from outside the district thronged into Telang Usan Hotel, Miri yesterday afternoon to participate in an open dialogue opposing the proposed Baram Hydro-electric Project.
STORY THREE:
"FOOTNOTES SHOULD BE HEADLINES"
SOURCE: FVIR (www.firstvoicesindigenousradio.org)
GLOBALLY
TEMPERATURES AND DISASTERS TELL A SORRY STORY

Since world leaders last gathered in Rio de Janeiro to talk about the state of the Earth, temperatures have climbed and disasters have mounted. As diplomats discussed climate, sustainability and biodiversity, here is the Earth by the numbers since 1992:
Temperatures
The average annual global temperature has increased 0.32 degrees Celsius since 1992 based on 10-year running averages, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Every year since 1992 has been warmer than the year of the original Rio conference.
Pollution
Global levels of the chief heat-trapping gas, carbon dioxide, climbed 10 per cent from nearly 358 parts per million in April, 1992, to 394 ppm this past April.
Disasters
Since 1992, natural disasters have affected 4.4-billion people worldwide, killed 1.3-million people and cost $2-trillion in damages, according to the United Nations. Earthquakes, storms, extreme temperatures and floods were the biggest killers.
Forests
Since 1990, the world's primary forest areas have decreased about 300-million hectares, according to the United Nations. That's an area larger than Argentina.
Free distribution and airplay for Pacifica Affliates interested in worldwide Indigenous affairs for the week of June 28th - July 5th 2012

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