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January 2010 Read December Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program January 7, 2010
HOST: Tiokasin Ghosthorse
CHRISTINE ROSE of Changing Winds gives up an update with the "2010 Winter Warmth Drive".
VICTOR TORO Victor Toro was a leftist political activist in the late sixties and early seventies in Chile. When the U.S backed coup that took place in Chile on September 11th, 1973, Victor along with his wife Nieves, and many other thousands were persecuted, kidnapped, tortured, killed and the ones that survived, eventually forced into exile. Victor has been residing in the United States for more than 25 years. Presently, a small community organization in the South Bronx called La Pena del Bronx. La Pena del Bronx, feeds the homeless and educates people about their constitutional, and immigration rights. At the present time, Victor is fighting deportation.
ROSA LOZANO of CISPES, the Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador joins JASON WALLACH a veteran media worker and a contributor to Upside Down World. The multi-national "gold" mining corporation PACIFIC RIM recently denied their involvement with the deaths of two prominent anti-mining activists in El Salvador. We talk about their role and the role of Indigenous peoples being affected by the mining, pollution, health, CAFTA and policies of profit between the government and Pacific Rim.
 
December 2009 Read December Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program December 31, 2009
RICHARD BOYDEN - of Operation Morning Star - State of Emergency for Indian Reservations Hit by Brutal Winter Storm: WARNING! Thousands of Native American families without heat and running out of food.
Over 1000 Native American families on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation are with propane for heat, are snowed in and can't get out to get food, and in many cases are unable to purchase food. below freezing temperatures, blizzard winds, and non-stop snow that created 3-10 foot snow drifts and buried all access roads into rural areas where thousands of homes are isolated throughout the Pine Ridge, Rosebud, Cheyenne River, Crow Creek, and Standing Rock Reservations.
audio link icon Listen to the Program December 24, 2009
MOSES BRINGS PLENTY - Strong Heart Society and ERIC Klein of CAN-DO Share their perspective on On the Internal Revenue Service's seizure and auction 7,112 acres of land (20% of the reservation) to recover unpaid employment taxes of $3,123,789.73. The land acreage is ranked 3rd in the U.S. as having potential "wind energy" that would bring the CCST out of it's unemployment rate of 85%. Also the Dakota 38 "Wokiksuya" Ride of 330 Mile Ride from Lower Brule, SD to Mankato, MN highlighting the forced removal of Native people to the Crow Creek Sioux Reservation and the U.S. largest execution. Take action by signing a petition or visit Take action by signing a petition or visitNDN News.
OFELIA RIVAS of the O'odham Solidarity Project, OANESS PRITZKER talk to us regarding the harassment of Indigenous peoples along the U.S./Mexican border; and the connection of the impediment to the construction of Homeland Security's joint program with the Border Patrol to build a border wall across the entire 330 mile U.S / Mexico border, a 65 mile section of which will run along the southern edge of the Tohono O'odham reservation. This wall will effectively cut in half the traditional territory of the O'odham and serve to isolate O'odham villages that exist on opposite sides of the border. To justify the building of this wall the government has once again used the fear of terrorism, common since 9/11, to advance its interests.
audio link icon Listen to the Program December 17, 2009
James Craven (Blackfoot) - Professor of Economics - A proposed $3.4 Billion Settlement has been reached with American Indian Plaintiffs in a long-running class action lawsuit against the federal government for mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts and trust assets.
Brandon Sazue (brandonsazue@hotmail.com) - Chairman of Crow Creek Sioux Tribe and Moses Brings Plenty - Strong Heart Society. On December 3, 20009 the Internal Revenue Service seized and auctioned 7,112 acres of land (20% of the reservation) to recover unpaid employment taxes of $3,123,789.73. The Bureau of Indian Affairs had informed CCST, because it was a federally recognized, it was not necessary to pay federal employment taxes. The land acreage is ranked 3rd in the U.S. as having potential "wind energy" that would bring the CCST out of it's unemployment rate of 85%. The CCST pays the 3rd highest rates of electricity in the U.S. No lands will change hands until after late March 2010 court date. Take action by signing a petition.
audio link icon Listen to the Program December 10, 2009
CHRISTINE ROSE coordinator for Changing Winds Advocacy Center supporting the well being of Native American children.
JASON WALLACH of upsidedownworld.org veteran media worker and solidarity activist and CARLA MARIA PEREZ of movementgeneration.org San Ramon, CA. Thirty-one people were arrested who gathered in protest of Chevron's global destruction of communities, the environment and the global climate. On December 7th, a Protest and Non-Violent Civil Disobedience was held at Chevron, California's worst climate polluter, on first day of United Nations 'climate change' negotiations in Copenhagen.
JAMES CRAVEN (Blackfoot) - Professor of Economics - A proposed $3.4 Settlement has been reached with American Indian Plaintiffs in a long-running class action lawsuit against the federal government for mismanagement of individual Indian trust accounts and trust assets. The Settlement is with the Secretary of the Interior, the Assistant Secretary of the Interior-Indian Affairs, and the Secretary of the Treasury. The individual Indian trust accounts relate to land, oil, natural gas, mineral, timber, grazing, water and other resources and rights on or under individual Indian lands.
audio link icon Listen to the Program December 3, 2009
Stephanie Seay - Buffalo Field Campaign (buffalofieldcampaign.org) is the only group working in the field every day in defense of the last wild buffalo population in the U.S. filed suit against the National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service for their shameful role in the harassment and slaughter of the Yellowstone bison, America's last wild population.
Lisa Tiger (lisatiger.com) Creek, Seminole and Cherokee has been one of the few public Native American faces of AIDS since 1992 when she was first diagnosed with HIV, advancing to AIDS in 1999.
Anne Keala Kelly - Noho Hewa premieres in New York thorugh the week of Dec. 3 through 10th. Winner of the Hawaii International Film Festival - Hewa means "wrong" and noho means "to occupy". This documentary is a contemporary look at Hawaiian people, politics and resistance in the face of their systematic erasure under U.S. laws, economy, militarism, and real estate speculation. It is a raw, unscripted story that makes critical links between seemingly unrelated industries, and is told from the perspective of Hawaiians.
 
November 2009 Read November Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program November 26, 2009: part one
audio link icon Listen to the Program November 26, 2009: part two
Robert Jensen is an associate professor at the University of Texas at Austin School of Journalism and author of the personal memoir All My Bones Shake: Seeking a Progressive Path to the Prophetic Voice, a compelling memoir that highlights the religious debate currently raging in the United States. I had the chance to contact Dr. Jensen to discuss some of the themes he raised in his book. Jensen can be reached at rjensen@uts.cc.utexas.edu and his articles can be found online.
audio link icon Listen to the Program November 19, 2009
GUEST: Ataahua Papa (Maori) - "Love the Islands" Benefit Concert at NYU on Saturday, November 21, 2009. The island nations of Samoa, Tonga, Amerikan Samoa and where all three were struck by tragedy on Sept. 29th, when an earthquake measuring 8.3 on the Richter Scale triggered a tsunami with waves of 20 feet and higher. Hundreds are gone and with many missing the small countries Indigenous peoples continue to rebuild their lives.
Marie-Helene Cousineau and Madeline Piujuq Ivalu (translation by Carol Kunuk) about a new "stunner of a film" called Before Tomorrow is the story of a woman who demonstrates human dignity and the ultimate challenge of survival. The film was shot by an all female crew, in remote locations near the community of Puvirnituq, Nunavik.
Music by Alex Jones (Mohawk) "Indian List" and Joy Harjo (Creek) "Witchi Tai To" www.bluesweb.com.
audio link icon Listen to the Program November 12, 2009
Philippe Diaz, Director/Writer of The End of Poverty - It began with military conquest, slavery and colonization that resulted in the seizure of land, minerals and forced labor. Today, the problem persists because of unfair debt, trade and tax policies - in other words, wealthy countries taking advantage of poor, developing countries, mostly Indigenous peoples.
Jennifer Jessum and Simon, Director/Producers of Holy Man - New evidence establishes that Douglas White, a terminally ill 88 year-old Lakota Sioux medicine man from Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, has been incarcerated in federal prison for the last 16 years for a crime he did not commit.
 
October 2009 Read October Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program October 8, 2009
Rebecca Adamson (Cherokee) Founder and Director of First Peoples World Wide (tel: 540/899-6545) The National Parks: America's Best Idea?
Leonardo Santiago Professional of the communication in public and cultural radio stations Mexico with Indigenous communities. Wade Davis author of The WAYFINDERS: Why Ancient Wisdom Matters in the Modern World
audio link icon Listen to the Program October 1, 2009
Evan Pritchard is the author of Henry Hudson and the Algonquins of New York chronicles the Sept 1609 arrival at Manhattan Island from the perspective of the people who met Hudson's boat. He discusses the 7 Fire Prophecies of the Algonquins and what it currently means to the world.
We also talk with Lance White Magpie, a direct descendant of Crazy Horse, and the exacting reality of teenage suicide rates of Pine Ridge Lakota Reservation in South Dakota.
 
September 2009 Read September Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program September 17, 2009
Mario Murillo discuses a recent agreement between Bogota and Washington for the U.S. to use seven military bases in Colombia, which has caused concern across Latin America. As the Obama Administration finalizes a deal with Colombian President Alvaro Uribe to open seven military bases for U.S. military forces, Human Rights Watch is calling on an investigation into the massacre of 38 indigenous people beginning in January 2009. Eyewitnesses point to the Armed Forces as the culprits, the latest example of state-sponsored terror carried out by the closest US ally in the Western Hemisphere.
Jessica Lee, Indymedia journalist, talks about her article "Hudson Is Not My Hero: Anniversary Highlights 400 Years of Exploitation" Starting with the Dutch colony New Amsterdam in 1624, the English take over in 1664 and finally the U.S. state of New York, the island experience almost a complete makeover. To make room for development, the land was stripped of its 573 hills, 66 miles of streams, 21 ponds, old-growth forests with American chestnut trees 120 feet tall and 4 feet wide, and dozens animal species - including the beaver. The Lenápe were forced out by colonization, disease and treaties that pushed them west.
Melissa K. Nelson from Indigenous Forum at Bioneers Conference 2009 - Indigenous peoples are on the front lines of climate change effects, often living in regions being impacted most heavily right now. What strategies are they adopting? Indigenous nonprofit organizations in the North and Global South continue to address challenges that push indigenous communities to the edge of economic, cultural and political extinction.
audio link icon Listen to the Program September 10, 2009
Wanbli and Ben Carnes with whoisleonardpeltier.info - Washington, D.C. to stand and fast in front of the White House between September 5th - 12th, in hopes of securing a meeting with President Obama. Earlier this year, the LP-DOC sent a letter to President Obama to discuss the case of Leonard Peltier, but the reply from the White House declined to invite members of the committee for a meeting. Leonard Peltier has been an international symbol of American injustice based upon critical questions surrounding his conviction in 1977 in the deaths of two FBI agents. Amnesty International has designated Peltier as a political prisoner and a U.S. prosecutor has admitted in court during an appeal hearing that he did not know who killed the agents and cannot prove who did. A federal judge who heard this statement was unable to afford any relief wrote a letter to Senator Inouye to ask the president to grant clemency. Carnes is a recipient of the 1987 Oklahoma Human Rights Award for his stand against forced hair cutting of Native prisoners.
Lisa Jones went to Wyoming for a four-day magazine assignment and came home four years later with a new life. At a dusty corral on the Wind River Indian Reservation, she met Stanford Addison, a Northern Arapaho who seemed to transform everything around him. He gentled horses rather than breaking them by force. It was said that he could heal people of everything from cancer to bipolar disorder. He did all this from a wheelchair; he had been a quadriplegic for more than twenty years. She listened to his story. Stanford spent his teenage years busting broncs, seducing girls, and dealing drugs. At twenty, he left the house for another night of partying. By morning, a violent accident had robbed him of his physical prowess and left in its place unwelcome spiritual powers -- an exchange so shocking that Stanford spent several years trying to kill himself. But eventually he surrendered to his new life and mysterious gifts. You can contact Stanford via email.
audio link icon Listen to the Program September 3, 2009
Rebecca Adamson (Cherokee) Founder and Director of First Peoples World Wide (tel: 540/899-6545) The Maasai of Africa, who consider themselves the earth's first cattle-herders, have turned to cultivating farmlands to survive, sparking a spate of unfounded reports on their environmental destructiveness. Maasai insist their traditional land-use practices are the best protection their ancient environment has ever known. The latest Maasai eviction victims add to "a new breed of refugee" identified by Charles C. Geisler, Cornell University. Global numbers for conservation refugees are impossible to come by. "However the most recent and rapid expansion of protected area initiatives has occurred in Africa and Asia," reports investigative journalist Mark Dowie in "Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Year Conflict Between Global Conservation and Native Peoples." Land areas protected for conservation purposes, Dowie adds, have risen from 600 in 1950, to 1,000 in 1990, to 110,000 today.
Relmulikan (Mapuche) describes the latest protests against the Chilean state who are encroaching and taking the original lands throughout the country. Jaime Mendoza Collío is the name of the 24 year old weichafe murdered by police. He was from the community Requem Pillán; the peñi (brother) participated in the reclamation of the Fundo (farm estate) San Sebastián, under the control of the latifundista (large farm proprietor) Sergio González Jarpa.The events occurred in the area of lower Malleco, near Collipulli, where militarized police from Santiago attacked community members at the estate in question. The police operation ended with eight community members detained; several of them were injured by gunshots - and all were family members of Jaime Mendoza, who was killed by a mortal shot. Over 100,000 Mapuche marched in the following weeks in August and September.
Wanbli (Dakota) (visit: whoisleonardpeltier.info) Recent discoveries about the U.S. Parole Commission's denial of parole for Leonard Peltier are stunning in that they used two stunning lies in the first 3 paragraphs of the denial to keep Leonard Peltier in prison for more years. Wanbli has the details on this outrageous misconduct by the United States Parole Commission. As a result of Peltier’s recent parole denial, Ben Carnes, Choctaw Nation, will go to Washington, D.C. to stand and fast in front of the White House between September 5th-12th, in hopes of securing a meeting with President Obama. Earlier this year, the LP-DOC sent a letter to President Obama to discuss the case of Leonard Peltier, but the reply from the White House declined to invite members of the committee for a meeting. Carnes is a recipient of the 1987 Oklahoma Human Rights Award. Supporters are also calling for a world wide 24 vigils on September 11th-12th to begin at 8:45 AM honoring those killed in the 911 incident and Leonards Birthday on the 12th. Carnes and Wanbli are both National Spokesmen for the LP DOC.
 
August 2009 Read August Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program August 20, 2009
NADA KHADER, director of Westchester People's Action Coalition interviews Kay Olan and Amanda Holmes regarding the unique languages of the Mohawk and how Tom Porter - Traditional Mohawk Chief of the Bear Clan - revitalized the spirit of the Mohawk Prophecy and return to the Mohawk Valley near Fonda, New York. Kay also gives an abbreviated rendition of the "Thanksgiving" address and the history of the Mohawk Valley.
 
July 2009 Read July Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program July 30, 2009
VAGABOND BEAUMONT is writer, producer, and director of the debut feature film MACHETERO that has been playing at festivals around the world and winning awards. A new cut of the film is making its world premiere at the prestigious 10th Annual New York International Latino Film Festival on August 1st at 10PM at the Clearview Cinemas Chelsea 230 West 23rd Street between 7th and 8th avenues. The New York International Latino Film Festival is one of the largest and well-known festivals of its kind.
JAY J. JOHNSON-CASTRO SR. is the director for the Rio Grande International Study Center (RGISC). RGISC works towards stewardship and protection of the Rio Grande Watershed, from its headwaters in Colorado to the gulf coast of the Caribbean. Since 2005, he has also been championing the ecology and environment of the Rio Grande corridor, filing suit against the Federal Government to protect endangered species in the Rio Grande region. In the past few years, he become recognized internationally as a human rights activist for his hundreds of miles of protest walks against the border wall and the "for profit" prison camps of thousands of immigrant refugees, especially T. Don Hutto prison camp where hundreds of children are imprisoned for profit in Taylor, Texas.
ROSS HAMILTON is the author of THE TRADITION OF THE GIANTS The implications of known, even more, of gigantic earthworks pre-American, prehistoric work would give cause to rethink old notions of western sciences. Spirit-animal forms, including the Opossum, the Serpent, the Boar, and a few others as yet unrecognized as effigies (such as Fort Hill near Serpent Mound), reflect a similar competency combining art and science. Contrary to established doctrine and even certain methods of carbon dating, they are appearing more and more to have had their nativities deep in the Archaic Period which ended 3,000 years ago.
audio link icon Listen to the Program July 23, 2009
Scott Frazier (Santee/Crow) elder from Montana, participated in the Eurasia Foundation's Civil Society Summit Environmental Panel in Moscow on July 6-7. Coinciding with the historic meeting between Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and U.S. President Barack Obama, Mr. Frazier was one of the representatives from the USA participating in summit meetings addressing environmental and human rights issues.
Keala Kelly is a Native Hawaiian journalist and filmmaker. Keala updates us on the Akaka Bill that has been delayed. Congressman Abercrombie pushed back the hearing and vote on the bill and when asked why, he said he wanted to make sure the white house is in agreement with the bill, in other words, they are going to make the language of the bill fit the agenda of the administration. In August, according to the United States, the State of Hawaii will celebrate its 50th anniversary, and yet the narrative about the fraudulence of the "state" is openly discussed out in public among Hawaiians, and the original Hawaiians.
audio link icon Listen to the Program July 9, 2009
Ana Maria Quispe (Peru)â "Business As Usual": Peru's government has given the green light to an Anglo-French company to drill for oil in the Amazon, just thirteen days after more than 30 people died in protests against the exploitation of the rainforest. The project, located on land inhabited by two tribes of uncontacted Indians, is believed to be Peru's biggest oil discovery in thirty years. The company, Perenco, a major gas supplier to the UK, has in the past denied any uncontacted Indians live there. Until recently, Perenco had been blocked from entering the area by local Indigenous protesters. With help from Peru's armed forces, the company managed to break through the blockade on at least one occasion. Perenco's chairman, Francois Perrodo, an Oxford University polo blue and scion of one of the wealthiest families in France, met Peru's President Garcia in Lima and pledged to invest $2bn in the project.
Wanbli (Dakota) National Spokesman Leonard Peltier Defense/Offense Committee - Leonard Peltier, who is in poor health, was recently assaulted, and is up for possible release this month after serving more than three decades in federal prisons. Peltier goes before the U.S. Parole Commission on July 28th, and America’s most prominent political prisoner and a symbol of Indigenous resistance, having served more than 33 years in federal prisons. He is subject to mandatory Parole Commission regulations stipulating that federal prisoners are presumed eligible for parole after 30 years, at least in the absence of severe prison infractions or threats to reoffend. Peltier has no assurances that the federal government will comply with its own laws. Peltier was wrongfully convicted in 1977 in connection with the deaths of two Federal Bureau of Investigation agents in a shootout at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. During the 1970s, the FBI armed and trained BIA police and death squads known as GOONs (Guardians of the Oglala Nation) to suppress an internal movement supported by the American Indian Movement against a U.S.-backed dictatorship.
Ross Hamilton - Author of A Tradition of Giants (Part 2) continues with a discussion of Racial Determinism as Political Ideology - an effort to downgrade Native history, culture through conclusions and hypothesis - popular and academically safe Darwinian summations. The "giants" were intimately involved with the tradition of the mound builder sites found throughout the northeastern and Ohio River Valley region of North America. Ross' Email: D.Ross.Hamilton@gmail.com.
audio link icon Listen to the Program July 3, 2009
Ross Hamilton is the author of A Tradition of Giants. He discusses one of the great enigmas of western and world anthropology: who were they, from where did they come, and why did they disappear? This is Part One of a series involving the little known prehistory of the Americas, especially North America. With rare exceptions, modern anthropology has difficulty admitting these people (giants) ever existed. Even as National Geographic shows evidence of ancient "little people" have been found in Asia and elswhere, there still remains a denial of the 1992 Native American Graves and Repatriation Act for Native peoples. The research continues about the facts that in North America, people of an implausible stature once resided in numbers enough to view their social order as different from any known to ethnologists. Part Two continues next week.
 
June 2009 Read June Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program June 25, 2009
Tom Porter (Mohawk) Traditional Chief and his family come back to the valley from which their forefathers were exiled almost two hundred years ago. The Mohawk Nation, along with the Oneida, Tuscarora, Onondaga, Seneca, and Cayuga, made up the Iroquois Confederacy. This unique system of intertribal government was founded to establish peace and democracy among all the nations of the Iroquois (or, as they called themselves, the Haudenosaunee People of the Longhouse), while preserving the integrity of each. The principles of democracy laid down by the Iroquois Confederacy would be admired by the Founding Fathers of the United States and woven into the fabric of the Constitution.
Mario Murillo, professor at Hofstra University, talks about the film "A Country of Peoples: Without Owners" was conceptualized, written, edited and produced by the Communication Team of the Association of Indigenous Councils of Northern Cauca, ACIN.
Adelard Blackmon (Dene) from Buffalo River, Saskatchewan, Canada serves on the United Nations Indigenous Commission on Human Rights talks of his experience and insight of the treatment of earth.
audio link icon Listen to the Program June 18, 2009
Guests: Fanny Brauning is the Director of No More Smoke Signals and Roxanne Two Bulls (Lakota) discuss the new feature documentary about a what a historical community radio staion KILI Radio "the Voice of the Lakota Nation" means to the Pine Ridge, Cheyenne River, and Rosebud Lakota Reservations in South Dakota.
Guest: Mike Kuzma is the Attorney for Leonard Peltier Convicted on the basis of fabricated and suppressed evidence, as well as coerced testimony, Leonard Peltier has been imprisoned for over 30 years for a crime he did not commit. Many people believe that the Peltier case is an issue of "left" versus "right". It's not. It's an issue of right versus wrong.
audio link icon Listen to the Program June 11, 2009
MASSACRE OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES IN PERU: Peruvian President Alan Perez in collusion with the US-Peru 'free trade agreements' and the expropriation of natural resources has escalated the crisis into the genocide of the Indigenous Peoples. Guests include ANDREW MILLER of Amazon Watch and ANA MARIA QUISPE (PERU)
CLIMATE CHANGE REFUGEES: Indigenous peoples forced to flee their homes due to environmental degradation. Although 'climate deniers' may dismiss the "climate crisis", for Indigenous peoples in Alaska who have now been displaced serves as a warning to 90,000 other Alaskans. In a little-noticed report released June 3rd, the Government Accountability Office suggested Congress create a lead government agency to direct the relief efforts now necessary due to global climate change. MEG WHITE is the editor of Buzz Flash
audio link icon Listen to the Program June 4, 2009
KAHENTINETHA HORN (Mohawk) Editor of the Mohawk Nation News joins us today regarding the blockading of both U.S. and Canadian bridges. Quote from the MNN Canada has always known that we were against putting guns in the hands of the border guards in the middle of our community. The US and Canada have abandoned their border checkpoints at Cornwall Island in the St. Lawrence River. The New York State Police and Cornwall City Police have closed down the bridges. We can't easily get on or off the island or go about our normal lives. In fact we are imprisoned. Canada created propaganda against us to provoke a confrontation and then an assault. Then the guns were to be put into the middle of our community. We think other indigenous communities might be next. Prime Minister Harper just announced a policy that he was going to generously fund those Indigenous who cooperate with resource development and extraction. The rest of us will just have to sink or swim. We are being isolated on the island. Our trade and commerce with each other is being deliberately crushed. This is having a dire impact on our ability to feed our families. About $100 million worth of construction is planned around Cornwall and on the island for a humongous international commercial transport depot. We would never approve this. Respondents around us think that the customs facility should be moved off Cornwall Island. Others think a joint Canada-U.S. customs facility should be built on the south side. People on the US side like to have guns to control and scare people. Canadians generally don't have the same necessity for them. Those CBSA guards who are being given guns have made it clear that they don't like us. They are dangerous.
 
May 2009 Read May Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program May 21, 2009
 
April 2009 Read April Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program April 30, 2009
Joe Harawira is a storyteller and tikanga (protocols) expert from the Waikato region of the North Island. Joe was born and bred in Whakatane, in the North Island of New Zealand. He is a storyteller, and an expert in tikanga (protocols) and is a passionate teacher and performer of kapahaka (perfoming arts). He has toured many times internationally, taking his skill in Maori storytelling and oratory with him to indigenous and storytelling festivals. Storytelling runs in Joe's extended family. "We come from a very oral tradition. As a small boy I'd go to the marae where the kaumatua (elders), who were all storytellers, would do their whaikorero (speech-making)." Previously working as a school teacher, Joe now works as Kaupapa Atawhai Manager in the Waikato Conservancy of the Department of Conservation. Joe is an exponent of the Maori language and a strong supporter of all Maori art forms.
Vernon Masayesva is a HOPI Elder and founder of Black Mesa Trust, founded in 1999 by Hopi people to address the severe impacts that Peabody Coal Company's water withdrawals from the Navajo Aquifer were having on the environment, cultures and well-being of the Hopi and Diné (Navajo) living on Black Mesa. For almost 30 years, the peoples' voices were not heard in the public processes and Peabody's water usage and mining activities went virtually unchallenged. Peabody was allowed to operate without any meaningful input from the people whose lives were so drastically altered by the company's activities. Wells, washes, and ancient springs were beginning to run dry. Cracks and fissures were appearing across Black Mesa - and the centuries old cultures of the Hopi and Diné that depended so heavily upon the pristine aquifer for religious, cultural and day-to-day uses, were suffering as a result. For the last 5 years, Black Mesa Trust has been working to educate Black Mesa residents and the wider public about the impacts of Peabody's pumping.
audio link icon Listen to the Program April 23, 2009
Our guest, Simon Sedillo, reports in October 23, 2006 the Lawrence Journal World or LJ World published an article which silently uncovered a funding scandal within Kansas University, in Lawrence, Kansas. In 2005, the university's department of geography received at least $500,000 in Department of Defense funds to map communally held Indigenous land in the states of San Luis Potosi, and in Oaxaca, Mexico. Concern has revolved around academic ethics violations due to improper transparency with communities about the research funding, serious U.S. Army violations of Mexican sovereignty, and of Indigenous autonomy. Our collective research over the last year has resulted in several key pieces of irrefutable evidence, demonstrating both academic ethics violations, and serious violations of Mexican sovereignty and Indigenous autonomy. Kansas University Geography professors, Peter Herlihy and Jerome Dobson received the funding for their mapping project, named the Bowman Expeditions, from the Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO) located at the Fort Leavenworth U.S. Army base in Leavenworth, Kansas. On the 14th of January, 2009, UNOSJO, the Union of Organizations of the Sierra Juárez of Oaxaca, released a communique in which the organization expresses concerns of BioPiracy in the Mexico Indigena mapping project, and claims that communities were deceived, having no idea that a primary funder of the project was the FMSO. UNOSJO cites a clear lack of transparency and additional suspicions of implications related to the US Army's controversial Human Terrain Mapping System. Indeed there is very compelling evidence that the FMSO is engaging in what they themselves define as "Civil Information Management in Support of Counterinsurgency Operations."
Johnathan Luna of the Beehive Collectiveand Polinizaciones talks about helping integrate the beehive graphic- and arts-based popular education tools with communities living and struggling against the realities of PLAN COLUMBIA, refered to as development projects and neoliberal economics.
audio link icon Listen to the Program April 16, 2009
Bradley Angel & Ophelia Rivas of Green Action comment on the Mexican government wanting to build a toxic dump to dispose of industrial hazardous wastes. The permit process has been conducted with no involvement of the Indigenous O'odham communities in decision-making processes. The proposed dump would desecrate the sacred ceremony site at Quitovac, and devastate the culture, traditions, sacred sites and spiritual well-being of the O'odham Indigenous peoples in both Mexico and the U.S. The dump would also expose children and nearby communities to dangerous toxins released in the land, air, and water, and could contaminate water the communities depend on. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has failed to uphold its responsibility to protect the O'odham people who are U.S. citizens who visit Quitovac for ceremonies and family visits. The EPA must strongly urge the Mexican government to reject the dump due to its impacts on O'odham, who are US citizens. For more information the O'odham Solidarity Project online.
From the Quechan Reservation, Arizona, we spoke with Phil Desparti, Terri George, and Terri Frazier about the disappearance of animal, bird and insect life within the last 3 months in SW Arizona/California/Mexico-US Border.
audio link icon Listen to the Program April 9, 2009
Kehaulani Kuaunui (Native Hawai'ian) with Indigenous Politics on the case of State of Hawaii v. Office of Hawaiian Affairs, et al. The Court has ruled that Congress' apology for overthrowing the Hawaiian monarchy in 1893 bears no moral, political or legal weight in stopping the State of Hawaii from selling 1.2 million acres of land seized during the illegal regime change before resolving land claims by Native Hawaiians. The case came about when the state petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court last year after the Hawaii Supreme Court issued an injunction prohibiting the state from selling or transferring these land held in trust until Native Hawaiians' claims to the land have been resolved. The Hawaii State Supreme Court based its decision on the Apology Resolution, passed by Congress in 1993 on the 100th anniversary of the destruction of the Hawaiian Nation. The apology acknowledged the illegality of the U.S. government's actions in overthrowing Hawaii's sovereign government, creating a "provisional government" and five years later passing the Newlands Resolution, which annexed Hawaii as a U.S. territory.
David Hernandez-Palmar (Wayuu) from Venezuela is a photographer, videomaker, activist, curator. Owners of the Water: Conflict & Collaboration Over Rivers (2008, 30 min.) depicts a campaign headed by the Xavante to protect the Rio das Mortes River Basin from the uncontrolled soy cultivation that brings deforestation and pollution to the watershed. The Xavantes' May 25, 2006 blockade of a national highway in Mato Grosso raises awareness of their concerns and builds support for their efforts. We ask the question "What is media democratization?" It is Indigenous use of media and what the Chavez government in Venezuela is doing to advance this process vs. the U.S sponsored militarization of Columbia and the Uribe administration against the Indigenous people.
 
March 2009 Read March Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program March 26, 2009
William Iggiagruk Hensley is the author of "Fifty Miles from Tomorrow" and has written a stirring memoir of his childhood among the Inupiat people of Alaska, his lifelong crusade, including a stint in Congress, to protect their culture and way of life. Hensley brilliantly portrays how the lessons he learned in childhood, battling the wilderness of Alaska without many basic necessities, helped him as an adult to battle the hardships of political corruption and deceit in order to preserve his heritage In 1971, after years of Hensley's tireless lobbying, the U.S. conveyed 44 million acres and earmarked nearly $1 billion for use by Alaska's native peoples. This is the inspiring true story of one man's quest to preserve and defend his people's "Ilitqusiat," or Native Spirit.
Cajaweah - Splitting the Sky VS. George Bush: On Tuesday, March 17, Splitting the Sky, a Mohawk activist from Six Nations now residing in Chase, BC, evoked international law and the Canada War Crimes Act by asking the RCMP to arrest ex-US-president G.W. Bush for crimes against humanity as he spoke at the Telus Convention Centre in downtown Calgary. He Former U.S. President, George W. Bush, was in Calgary with "cowboy" hat in hand on March 17 to seek the affection of the men and women attending the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association meeting CEPA. It was sponsored by the Calgary Chamber of Commerce and law firms Ernst and Young and Bennett Jones. Thirteen-hundred corporate business types paid $400 per plate. One Bush fan cooed, "He must be intelligent to be so witty". Doesn't he know that a team of speech writers carefully crafted every word he said? Bush came to "Texas North", as Calgary is called, to help his international and American cohorts scoop out more Indigenous resources such as water, gas and oil. He wants the corporations to stay in private hands so they can grab 6 trillion cu. ft. of natural gas; 950 million barrels of liquid hydrocarbons; lay 100,000 km. of pipe over our territory; and pocket $67 billion from exports of our resources while polluting all our territories and waters. Gale Davidson of Lawyers Against the War of Vancouver crafted a legal position that under Canadian law Bush could be arrested for being a suspected war criminal.
audio link icon Listen to the Program March 19, 2009
Corine Fairbanks joins us from the American Indian Movement, Santa Barbara, California. Carpinteria is the latest flashpoint of anti-Indian racism in California. Since March 2008, when a 15 year old student at Carpinteria High School petitioned to the school board to remove a racist school mascot, the Native community in Carpinteria has suffered a lynch mob-like backlash from the non-Native townspeople. On March 17th the Carpinteria school board reconvened to overturn their previous ruling to remove the racist imagery in a carefully orchestrated event at the school gymnasium intended to humiliate and intimidate the Native community.
Garret Rosenblat, of Braiding through Water: Weaving Traditional and Western Knowledge. Internationally acclaimed scientists, teachers, and artists including water science pioneer Masaru Emoto featured in the film What the ##*!!# Do We Know, Quiet Axis creator painter and environmental/space artist Lowry Burgess of Carnegie Mellon University, and artist/muralist Michael Kabotie of the Hopi Tribe will soon gather April 6 - 7, 2009 with Hopi traditional leaders and teachers, including Tobacco/Rabbit Clan at Hotevilla Keeper of the Pipe Jerry Honawa and former Hopi Chairman Vernon Masayesva, to explore what new paradigms of understanding arise from the braiding of Western and traditional Hopi sciences.
Brian Wright-Macleod, from Renegade Radio CKLN (CKLN.FM) 88.1FM Toronto, Ontario, Canada - A voice of dissent in a world of compromise. Renegade Radio is the foremost first nations program on the planet! Outspoken, honest and outrageous, join Brian Wright-McLeod and co-host Vikki Victoria for the issues and music of the contemporary Native world. Parental Advisory.
audio link icon Listen to the Program March 12, 2009
Ofelia Rivas (Tohono 0'odham) of O'odham Solidarity Project who delivered a speech to the Zapatisa Movement in Mexico City discusses the continuing denial of her nation's injustice by the U.S. Homeland Security--who held her at gunpoint demanding identification - among other violations.
Dr. Greg Anderson of the Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages, Livingtongues.org urgently educates the non-Indigenous world about the extinction of languages where every two weeks the last fluent speaker of a language passes on and with him/her goes literally hundreds of generations of traditional knowledge encoded in these ancestral tongues.
audio link icon Listen to the Program March 5, 2009
CRISTINE ROSE - Coordinator of CHANGING WINDS ADVOCACY CENTER talks of her organizations efforts to revitalize "baseball for the reservation Lakota children.
CHARMAINE WHITE FACE - Coordinator of the Defenders of the Black Hills - a non-profit group of volunteers involvement with anti-nuclear thought processes.
 
February 2009 Read February Program Transcripts paper icon
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January 2009 Read January Program Transcripts paper icon
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Steven Heape of Rich-Heape Films discusses "Trail of Tears Cherokee Legacy" exploring AmericaÕs darkest period: President Andrew JacksonÕs Indian Removal Act of 1830-38 and the forced removal of the Cherokee to Oklahoma.
We also talk with Mallory Knodel, co-director of the Indigenous Film Series as she reports from Belem, Brazil on the World Social Forum.
Karah Woodward is a journalist who was in LaPaz, Boliva covering the new Bolivian Constitution approved by voters on January 25 and talks of the oppostion's elite minority and the majority of Indigenous vote.
audio link icon Listen to the Program January 22, 2009
Producer KARAH WOODWARD from La Paz, Bolivia covers constitutional referendum, which is a major turning point for all Bolivians. January 25 will be the first time in the nation's history that the population will vote on the state's founding document. A new constitution includes serious political and social reforms. Those who are the most hopeful are Bolivia's indigenous people.
MARIJO MOORE Marijomoore.com author discusses her new sequel novel "When the Dead Dream" published by Renegade Planets Publishing.
LEONARD PELTIER'S LIFE IN JEOPARDY www.whoisleonardpeltier.info Not long after being transferred to USP-Canaan, PA-Leonard Peltier #89637-132 was assaulted.
JOHN KANE letstalknativepride.blogspot.com the U.S.4th Dept. Appellate Court grants preliminary injunction to Cayugas after NY state Supreme Court Justice Fisher ruled tribe doesn't have sovereign rights to sell tax-free tobacco.
audio link icon Listen to the Program January 15, 2009
KEALA KELLY www.nohohewa.com is a Hawaiian journalist and filmmaker reporting on politics, culture, the environment and indigenous peoples. NOHO HEWA is a winner of the Hawaii International Film Festival's 2008 Halekulani Golden Orchid Award For Best Documentary In the Hawaiian language, hewa means "wrong" and noho means "to occupy". This documentary is a contemporary look at Hawaiian people, politics and resistance in the face of their systematic erasure under U.S. laws, economy, militarism, and real estate speculation. It is a raw, unscripted story that makes critical links between seemingly unrelated industries, and is told from the perspective of Hawaiians. NOHO HEWA is the first feature length film produced by Hawaiian journalist and filmmaker Anne Keala Kelly, who directed, shot and edited the film over the course of five years.
MARIO MURILLO author and host of WBAI's Friday morning "WAKE UP CALL" returns from Colombia after covering the dramatic six-week Indigenous mobilization, demanding respect for their territorial and democratic rights, and calling for the creation of a broad-based movement for social change.
JOHN KANE letstalknativepride.blogspot.com discusses the impact and strained relations with state of New York regarding the Seneca Nation President Barry E. Snyder Sr., supported by the Tribal Council, announcing a series of actions designed to protect the Seneca people from state incursions into their lives, while elevating the Nation’s response level to New York State’s threatening decisions. They clashed back in 1992 and 1997 leading to civil unrest on local reservations. With a February 13th deadline looming for collection of taxes on cigarettes sold to Indian reservations by wholesalers, the Seneca Nation of Indians is preparing for another clash with NYS just in case. Seneca president Barry Snyder says the nation will take any prudent action to protect the its economy and way of life.
audio link icon Listen to the Program January 8, 2009
Guests: TEYEKAHLIYOS (Daygots) - Oneida - Youth Project regarding her new music and the struggle of her nation the Oneida of NY
JULIAN AGUON - Chamoru Rights Advocate, who is from the Chamoru Nation of Guam, who spoke at the Seventh Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. The Chamoru people of the island we know as Guam have waged a long struggle for an act of self-determination as a significant step in their struggle to protect their land and culture from the effects of U.S. militarization. Their movement for non-violent social change in their homeland is largely unknown to mainstream media.The island has served as a U.S. military base for many years and now plans are underway to increase the military presence amongst these peaceful people.
audio link icon Listen to the Program January 1, 2009
Keala Kelly Hawaiian journalist and filmmaker reports on politics, culture, the environment and Indigenous peoples. NOHO HEWA ("the wrongful occupation of Hawaii") The Hawaiian Kingdom, a recognized nation state during the last half of the 19th century, was illegally overthrown in 1893 by a U.S backed military coup. The U.S. admitted to this wrongful act in 1993 with what is referred to as the Apology Resolution, wherein they apologized for their role in the wrongful overthrow of a peaceful nation. Bill Clinton signed it into law and it became public laws 105-150.
After the U.S. backed the overthrow, they took possession of Hawaii five years later and without a treaty of annexation (their own congress would not vote to annex) they claim to have annexed Hawaii. The entirety of the crown and government land was then referred to as "ceded land." but it was never actually ceded because the Native Hawaiian people and their government never agreed to become part of the United States. In 1959, after the U.S. had a fraudlent statehood vote, that same land was "given" to the state of Hawaii.
The Native Hawaiin Government Reorganization Act of 2007 (S. 310, H.R. 505), was a bill before before the 110th United States Congress. It is commonly known as the Akaka Bill after U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka, D-HI, who has proposed various forms of this bill since 2000. The bills proposed seek to establish a process for Native Hawaiians to gain federal recognition similar to the recognition that some Native American tribes currently possess. The House version of the bill (H.R. 505) passed on October 24, 2007.
 
December 2008 Read December Program Transcripts paper icon
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The Story Of Stuff by Annie Leonard. From its extraction through sale, use and disposal, all the stuff in our lives affects communities at home and abroad, yet most of this is hidden from view. The Story of Stuff is a fact-filled look at the underside of our production and consumption patterns. The Story of Stuff exposes the connections between a huge number of environmental and social issues, and calling for a sustainable and just world. It'll teach you something, it'll make you laugh, and it just may change the way you look at all the stuff in your life forever. Especially, on this day, a holiday for most consumers. Annie Leonard is an expert in international sustainability and environmental health issues, with more than 20 years of experience investigating factories and dumps around the world.
audio link icon Listen to the Program December 4, 2008
Moonanum James (Wampanoag) and Juan Gonzalez from the Maya Council of Elders and the United American Indians of New England as they commemorate the annual Day of Mourning.
Tom Anthony and Leon Siu (AupuniHawai'i) speak about the US Supreme Court's announcement today that they have accepted the writ of certiorari filed by the State of Hawaii, which seeks to reverse the Hawaii State Supreme CourtÕs decision of January 31, 2008 that curtails the StateÕs ability to sell, or otherwise dispense of, what is commonly referred to as Òthe Ceded Lands.Ó The acceptance of the ÒcertÓ means that the US Supreme Court will review the submitted arguments and render its decision. The State of Hawaii is counting on a favorable ruling from the U.S. Supreme Court. At stake is the very survival of the 50th State of the union. The land in question is the 1.8 million acres (nearly half the total land area of the Hawaiian Archipelago) that was hijacked from the government and the crown heads of the Hawaiian Kingdom in 1894 by the illegal, self-declared, rebel government, the Republic of Hawaii. A few years later, in 1898, the Republic of Hawaii ÒannexedÓ itself to the United States, and in the process, passed off (ÒcededÓ) the stolen lands to the U.S. The puppet government, the State of Hawaii, is now holding the bag of stolen property deceptively called the ÒCeded Lands.Ó
 
November 2008 Read November Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program November 27, 2008, 3:00 - 5:00 PM
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10AM to 5PM FROM PLYMOUTH AND BEYOND-The myth of the American ÒThanksgivingÓ and the Indigenous perspectives of Turtle Island regarding celebration, denial, rational justifications now used by all races, classes, and religions in the United States and the occupation of Turtle Island. The story untold about the truth of AmericanÕs history propagandized by likes of self-entitlement, elitism, theory and hierarchical thinking? --more to come including contacts and websites.
audio link icon Listen to the Program November 20, 2008
Manuel Rozenthal from the Association of Indigenous Councils of Northern Cauca, ACIN and Minaga Popular arrive in Bogota, Colombia today and will participate in a mass march and rally that began October 10, 2008. The organizers hope to meet/debate once again with President Uribe, but more importantly, to return the solidarity they received during their long trek from Cali to Bogota. The start of a national movement seems likely. There is concern about new developments in the US like the naming of Eric Holder to be attorney general, a defender of Chiquita Brands Int'l in its case involving their payments to the paramilitary AUC in Colombia. The peoples of Colombia are anti-Free Trade Agreement and have written a letter to President Elect Barack Obama.
Luz Schreiber, community organizer and Tania Romero raised in Guayaquil, Ecuador is a founding member of Ollin Imagination! discuss the New Constitution of Ecuador, and it's inclusion of Mother Earth, prohibiting discrimination, respecting private property, increasing spending on health care and the poor, and ensuring more rights for Indigenous groups. In a country rich with ecological treasures, including the Galapagos Islands and part of the Amazon rain forest, the constitution also calls on government to avoid measures that would destroy ecosystems or drive species to extinction, the first such measure of its kind. The new constitution includes five revolutionary articles granting legal rights to nature (described in the document as "Pachamama," the mother Earth goddess of the indigenous Andean people). One of the most biodiverse nations on the planet, it is now the first to give such far-reaching legal protection to the natural world.
audio link icon Listen to the Program November 13, 2008
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Martha Redbone discusses the Native Theater Festival and musical/activist involvement/evolvement of her mixed Native and African heritage.
John Lindsay Polan, journalist, on Gen. Mario Montoya, commander of the Armed Forces of Colombia, stepped down November 4th amidst the growing scandal involving the use of "false positives" by the Colombian Army, that is, the killing of civilians and passing them off as guerillas of the FARC fallen in combat. The broader theme of militarization and its impact on human rights for Colombia's Indigenous, peasant and working poor is among the many points being put forward by the Popular Minga, which will be marching from Cali to Bogota beginning next week.
Mari Boine is a Norwegian Sami musician known for having added jazz and rock to the yoiks of her native people. Boine (born in Finnmark, Norway) grew up amid the Laestadian Christian movement as well as amidst discrimination against her people. She was asked to perform at the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, but refused because she perceived the invitation as an attempt to bring a token minority to the ceremonies. In the strict lestadian milieu joik was viewed as the devils work. "I am not Christian today", she says, "But I have a holistic religion. I think this religion is gaining ground world wide."
 
October 2008 Read October Program Transcripts paper icon
audio link icon Listen to the Program October 30, 2008
Mario Murillo on COLOMBIA'S PARADIGM WAR. In short, the struggle for indigenous rights must not be seen as a one-dimensional struggle affecting a small proportion of the broader Colombian population, that is, the approximately two-million Indigenous people living in the hundreds of resguardos throughout the national territory. Unfortunately, this shortsighted critique of the Indigenous movement is shared by sectors of both the right and the left, and reflects a limited understanding of the historical processes that have unfolded in complex ways within the communities themselves. It also fails to recognize the diversity of the movement, the many organizations and political tendencies that make up the movement, and the manner in which, despite their significant differences, they have coalesced with other sectors of society to confront the intolerance of the Colombian establishment.
From United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck, ND, Dr. David Gipp, Dr. Jim Davis, Scott Davis, Brad Hawk, and Alyssa Albers discuss the origins of "Native American (tribal)" colleges and the process of receiving an inclusive cultural education in regards to "western" compulsory educative format.
audio link icon Listen to the Program October 23, 2008
Mario A. Murillo is Associate Professor in the School of Communication at Hofstra University and is currently living in Colombia. More than 10,000 indigenous Colombians have begun a protest march against President Alvaro Uribe. Marchers are protesting the militarization of their territories, the U.S.-Colombia Free Trade Agreement, and the failure of UribeÕs administration to fulfill various accords with the indigenous communities.
Milo Yellow Hair, Lakota, converses on the impacts of multi-national mining and the state of the Lakota Nation in South Dakota. More information can be found here.
audio link icon Listen to the Program October 16, 2008
 
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October 13, 2008 3:00 - 5:00 pm
First Voices Indigenous Radio special program, part 5.
First Voices Indigenous Radio special program, part 4.
 
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October 13, 2008 6:00 - 9:00 am
First Voices Indigenous Radio special program, part 3.
First Voices Indigenous Radio special program, part 2.
First Voices Indigenous Radio special program, part 1.
audio link icon Listen to the Program October 9, 2008
SEGMENT 1: Guest: "Footsouljahs" (www.bebo.com/Footsouljahs) A Samoan Hip Hop group member K.O.S. 163 spoke of the state of music an his interpretation in Aotearoa (New Zealand) and the relegation by mainstream society.
SEGMENT 2: Guests: Horge Arias, Dora Munoz and journalist, WBAI's Wake Up Call host Mario Murillo (mamaradio.blogspot.com) Recent developments in Columbia on Monday, Oct 6th, 2008 three Embera Chami indians were killed in the department of Caldas, apparently by what are known here as The New Generation of Paramilitaries €quilas Negras or black eagles. The effects of the Colombia-U.S. Free Trade Agreement policies and growing scandals are threatening Indigenous territories and cultural rights.
 
September 2008 Read September Program Transcripts paper icon
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August 2008 Read August Program Transcripts paper icon
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July 2008 Read July Program Transcripts paper icon
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UPDATE: 87-year-old Lakota medicine man, Douglas White, has spent the last fifteen years in prison for a crime he did not commit. The film is Holy Man by Jennifer Jessum and Simon Joseph.
ALSO: Tara Pretends Eagle whose son was born with Neuroborreliosis, an infection of the brain that spreads throughout the body, passed on to him via the womb unknowingly. This disease also known as Lyme Disease. It took five years to find a pediatrician that specializes in Lyme Disease. There is only one in the country, Dr. Charles Ray Jones, in Connecticut. Dr. Jones has saved 10,000 children from this sometimes deadly disease. However, he is been charged by the Connecticut Medical Exam Board which jeopardizes his license to practice medicine and the possibility of 3,000 children that will go without medical care. Guidelines on Lyme Disease Treatment created by a professional group of infectious disease doctors has carried a lot of weight in the United States. They have been used by insurance companies to deny people antibiotic treatment for longer than a month or two, especally IV antibiotics. It is also criteria used by infectious disease doctors to not test.
audio link icon Listen to the Program July 10, 2008
The Longest Walk Two marks the 30th Anniversary of 1978 that resulted in historic changes for Native Americans. The ÒwalkÓ followed two routes, a Northern and a Southern culminating in Washington, D. C. on Tuesday July 8th with the message of much needed awareness about the planetary crisis by walking 8,000 miles to reconnect with the land, increase respect for cultural diversity, stimulate dialogue about connections between nature and culture, and protect sacred lands and diverse spiritual practices. We talk with Thomas Andrews, a New Mexico organizer, and Bonita Leonard from Warm Springs/Nez Perce and participant in ÒThe Peoples WalkÓ which is a more traditional stance on where the power of the land resides.
Mark Tilsen, President of Native American Natural Foods, is focused on creating a family of nationally branded food products that are delicious and that promote a Native American way of wellness that feeds mind, body, and spirit. Based on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, Native American Natural Foods provides a category of natural healthy choices in the market place that currently does not exist.
audio link icon Listen to the Program July 3, 2008
Interview with Ian F. Hancock, a professor of English, linguistics and Asian studies at The University of Texas at Austin. The Honorable Ian F. Hancock Roma is a representative to the UN Economic and Social Council and Member of the International Romani Parliament and the author of "Pariah Syndrome: An account of Gypsy Slavery and Persecution".
 
June 2008 Read June Program Transcripts paper icon
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Jennifer Jessum and Simon Joseph filmmakers of Holy Man discuss DOUGLAS WHITE, an 87 year old Lakota Sioux medicine man, who has spent the last 15 years in federal prison for a crime he did not commit. Douglas is the oldest living and longest practicing medicine man from the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota. In October, 1991, after a long-standing custody battle between Douglas and his daughter in law, Mr. White was accused of sexually abusing his two grandsons. The tribal court fully investigated the case, brought it to trial and dismissed it for lack of evidence. Over a year later, the federal government reopened the case and charged him with the same crime. He was tried by an all-white jury in a language he did not fully understand, with no physical evidence and contradictory testimony. At the age of 72, he was convicted to 292 months in federal prison. In most places in America, this would be considered double jeopardy, but for American Indians, this is an everyday occurrence. The Lakota Sioux are well-known world-wide for producing powerful political and spiritual leaders like Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull. They are also well known for the long-standing oppression they have been subject to at the hands of the government due to their struggle for sovereignty, independence and their unwillingness to sell their sacred lands. There are startling parallels between Douglas' story and the stories of other American Indian political and spiritual leaders who were taken away from their people. The same tactics used by the government in the 1800s through the uprising of the American Indian Movement in the 1970s and 80s, with which Douglas was associated, continue today and illustrate the environment in which Douglas was tried and convicted. Although the film focuses primarily on Douglas White and the Lakota people, this case illustrates the prejudices and problems that all American Indians face today, particularly within the criminal justice system. While Douglas is only one of thousands of stories, his is unusual due to his role as a wicasa wakan or holy man. Douglas' life has been a life of tireless service and sacrifice. His story offers a glimpse into the mysterious and sacred world of Lakota religion and shows the beauty and power of their spiritual traditions which are a source of strength and empowerment for the Lakota people. It is this very source of strength, their connection to the land and spirit, that undermines the government's desire to control, contain and destroy this once powerful nation. Although the old signs and advertisements that read "The only good Indian is a dead Indian" are no longer run in newspapers, the sentiment is still, quite tragically, present and active today.
audio link icon Listen to the Program June 12, 2008
Susan Shapiro of Indian Point Safe Energy Coalition discusses the issues of leaks of Radioactive waste into Hudson River, the call on the NY State officals not to renew discharge permit, reduction of fire safety standards from 1 hour to 24 minutes, increased cancer rates surrounding Indian Point thyroid cancer 70% higher than national average carbon footprint of nuclear comparable to natural gas including uranium mining (Native American communities) processing. CFC gases, shipping, superheating the river, plus tons of high level radioactive waste storage indefinitely, maybe permanently on the banks of the Hudson River.
Steven R. Heape is the producer of the newly released DVD Our Spirits Don't Speak English, Rich-Heape Films. After breaking numerous treaties, seizing Indian lands, and destroying Native economies, the United States intended the Indian Boarding School system as the final element in the destruction of the Native American Tribes. The objective was the total assimilation of indigenous peoples and the obliteration of their native cultures. Many educators of Native Americans, as well as the BIA, actually believed in the idea that they had to Òkill the Indian, save the manÓ. What followed was a system of heinous abuse and genocide perpetrated upon Native Americans by the United States which lasted until the late twentieth century. Indian Boarding Schools operated under the authority and auspices of the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the years 1890 to present. Native American children were forcibly removed from their homes and families to attend Indian Boarding Schools. BIA agents barged into the homes of Native Americans and dragged their children away from their families in order to assimilate them into Òwhite societyÓ. In 1891, Congress passed the Indian Appropriations Act, which required all Native American children to attend school and authorized the Bureau of Indian Affairs to withhold federal rations from any Indian family who refused to send their children away to school. Families were essentially starved to force the conscription of their Indian children to the Boarding Schools. At the Indian Boarding Schools, children were subjected to numerous forms of abuse and atrocities. These atrocities committed against Native American children included sexual abuse, mental and psychological abuse, and physical abuse.
audio link icon Listen to the Program June 5, 2008
Christine Halvorson is the Director of the Rainforest Foundation US. The Xingu Encounter 2008 was a 5-day mass gathering of over 1,000 Brazilian Amazon Indigenous and their allies to protest the development and construction of five government-supported hydroelectric dam projects on the Xingu River.
Tamra Brennan is with us from the Black Hills of South Dakota. The new investors of Broken Spoke Campground, LLC, Target Logistics Corporation, have been made fully aware of the significance and protection for Bear Butte. Issues include, the unsuitability of this location, unacceptable noise and disturbance, that this location continues to cause, to those who travel to Bear Butte who need solitude and serenity. They fail to take into account local concerns of impacts to the spiritual, cultural, and natural resources at Bear Butte. Bear Butte is a place of prayer where the natural environment needs to be free from negative influences of alcohol that could affect religious beliefs and practices of those who travel from around the world to pray. Target Companies marketing campaign is very aggressive. Plans were announced to open Sturgis County Line year round. Biker rally events are currently scheduled in June, July, and August for the annual Sturgis Rally. With this new year-round expansion, it will virtually become impossible all summer, to pray in peace at Bear Butte. This issue has escalated and is now more critical than ever. Target Logistics currently have plans to expand the venue. Why the great concern about these corporations interest in this location at Bear Butte? They were founded in 1978 and have in excess of $50M in capital. Some of their clients include the Secret Service, the feds, and military. They build temporary cities for areas in war.
 
May 2008 Read May Program Transcripts paper icon
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From 10:30AM - 1:00PM FVIR presents part of the SPRING 2008 FUNDRAISER, offering two CD's, two hours, of Indigenous Perspective on Global Climate Change with Alex Ewing, Steven T. Newcomb (Shawnee/Delaware) of the Indigenous Law Institute, Professor Nick Robinson of Environmental Law at Pace University, and Chief Oren Lyons (Onondaga) a professor at the State University of Buffalo.
audio link icon Listen to the Program May 8, 2008 part 2
Steven T. Newcomb at Bluestockings Bookstore, New York, NY presents a lecture regarding the Vaticans Papal Bull's 1493 proclamation. All lectures featured an unprecedented view of "climate change" and the traumatic effects, actions and more taken by Indigenous peoples world wide.
audio link icon Listen to the Program May 1, 2008
Today's guests include Jenny Luna (www.peaceanddignityjourneys.com) and Sara James (www.gwichinsteeringcommittee.org). At sunrise today in Alaska, dozens of runners will embark from Anchorage Alaska and the tip of Argentina on the 2008 Peace and Dignity Run culminating in November 2008 in Panama.
Also on today's show is Neville 'Chappy' Williams, Wiradjuri Traditional Elder & Natalie Lowrey, Friends of the Earth Australia (www.savelakecowal.org) speak of the resistance to Barrick Gold.
Following is "Voices From the Brazilian Amazon". Leaders and videomakers from Indigenous communities in Brazil will discuss the importance of their traditional knowledge, land rights, conservation, and cultural continuity, sharing their perspectives about the future. KumarŽ Txic‹o (Ikpeng) is a videomaker and the president of the Association of Ikpeng People. He lives in the village of Moygu in Xingu Indigenous Park, Zezinho Yube (Hunikui) an environmental agriculture agent in the Praia do Carapan‹ Indigenous territory in the state of Acre. Takum‹ Kuikuro (Kuikuro) and Divino Tserewahœ (Xavante) from the village of Sangradouro, all are from the state of Mato Grosso.
 
April 2008 Read April Program Transcripts paper icon
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We speak with the Western Shoshone Defense Project team of Carrie Dann, Julie Fishel, Larson Bill, Gene Harry regarding the ties with the Aboriginal Australian and Papa New Guinea's resistence to the largest "gold" multinational mining intruder Barrick Gold Corporation. Joining us is environmentalist Sakura Saunders and Jethro Tulin - Papa New Guinea. (protestbarrick.net)
audio link icon Listen to the Program April 10, 2008
Bruce T. Martin, an Historical Preservation Photographer, and MariJo Moore, writes commentaries on Native issues have aired on NPR and WBAI 99.5, First Voices/Indigenous Radio in NYC, discuss, LOOK CLOSE SEE FAR: A Cultural Portrait of the Maya
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Amylee, Haudenausaunee Storyteller and Herbal Educator (www.hernativeroots.com) and Janeen Comenote, Founding member of National Urban Indian Family Coalition (www.nuifc.org). Native people face some of the most dire socio-eco-nomic conditions of any group in America. Within this population, urban Indians face unique challenges. Federal funding does not always directly address their needs, and their location in AmericaÕs cities mean that part of the safety net available to Native children and families living on reservations or tribal territories are un-available to them.
 
March 2008 Read March Program Transcripts paper icon
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Rosalie Little Thunder co-founder of the Buffalo Field Campaign joins us, as well as Darrell Geist who is in West Yellowstone, Montana. Each winter, Montana livestock officials kill bison when they migrate out of Yellowstone National Park in search of grazing land. Each winter the Buffalo Field Campaign is there to dodge the U.S. National Park Service from hazing, corralling and finally slaughtering the sacred being called the buffalo. This season's bison slaughter in Yellowstone National Park has reached an historic high not seen since the 19th century when bison were nearly wiped out.
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Jim Thebaut, writer, producer and director of "RUNNING DRY" project, is interviewed about his highly acclaimed documentary feature about the global water crisis. It is a global call to action about the evolving world water humanitarian crisis. Also www.changingwinds.org's beginning to build a Native childrens library including more information on The Indian Child Welfare Act and a call for action.
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What role can indigenous or “precapitalist” forms of knowledge and spirituality play in this transformation, and what are the politics of mobilizing them, and does the recent (re)turn to consciousness mark a significant break from the distinction between idealism and materialism?
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Phil Narkle, Aboriginal tribal elder and Darryl Milovchevich, director of “The Gold We Search For”, also with Barry Skye, a consultant working on issues of domestic violence for Indian Country out of Superior Wisconsin.
 
February 2008 Read February Program Transcripts paper icon
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Thunderbolts: the Tutorial (now on DVD). There are no ‘Black Holes’, there is no ‘dark matter’, comets are not ‘dirty snowballs’, the sun is not a ‘nuclear furnace’, and the origins of world mythology are not primitive invention but can be directly linked to deep space exploration and leading-edge experiments in plasma physics. The Thunderbolts theory challenges our fundamental assumptions about the workings of the universe, and then offers an alternative vision. Born of empirical science, this vision is startling in its common sense simplicity, and stunning in its reach and ability to make comprehensible both age-old and modern day mysteries.
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Steve Newcomb, author of Pagans in a Promised Land: Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery.
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January 2008 Read January Program Transcripts paper icon
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Danko Miriman updates of international demonstrations -Tuesday the 28th after MISN hand delivered a letter to the NY Chilean Consulate. Patricia Troncoso ended a 111 day hunger strike had focused attention on the plight of the Mapuche minority. Activists say that despite Chile's economic growth, the Indians have been left largely landless, impoverished victims of police repression and anti-terrorism laws. The Mapuche have never used weapons. Also, Oren Lyons, Onondaga from the Haudenosaune speaks of the differences and non-consequential living. Finally, written accounts of the 1890 Massacre at Wounded Knee of the Mnicoujou Lakota.
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Santiago, Chile - There have been demonstrations every day in Santiago since the killing of a young Mapuche man, Matias Catrileo, who was shot in the back by Chilean police on 3 January this year on the outskirts of Vilcun, IX Region of Araucan’a. On 22 January five protestors were detained by police in La Moneda Palace in Santiago. Our guests: Danko Miriman - Mapuche International Solidarity Network from Chile, Roberto Cachimuel - Kichwa Runa from Ecuador and Rodstarz and G1 - Rebel Diaz.
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Amerindians: The Return written directed and choreographed by Cristina Cortes. Second segment an interview with Ofelia Rivas, founder of Voices Against the Wall.
 
December 2007 Read December Program Transcripts paper icon
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Kent Lebsock of the Owe Aku or Bring Back the Way organization situated on the Pine Ridge Lakota Reservation brings an urgent matter regarding Debra and Alex White Plume of the Oglala Lakota.
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Film activist Annie Leonard is an expert on the materials economy. Her new 20-minute online film, The Story of Stuff, details the costs and consequences of consumer culture.
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MariJo Moore, of Cherokee, Irish and Dutch ancestry is an author / artist / poet / essayist / lecturer / editor / publisher / workshop presenter.
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Starlight Tyler is a North American Indian woman and soulful singer who blends the classic sounds of Jazz with the earthiness of the Blues and delivers it with a prolific storytelling ending.
 
November 2007 Read November Program Transcripts paper icon
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Soni Caballero is the manager of the gallery at the American Indian Community House in New York City, which supports traditional and non-traditional, contemporary Native American art.
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Indigenous People's Day Special, part 1 (Airplay from 10 AM to 7 PM).
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Indigenous People's Day Special, part 2 (Airplay from 10 AM to 7 PM).
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Indigenous People's Day Special, part 3 (Airplay from 10 AM to 7 PM).
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Indigenous People's Day Special, part 4 (Airplay from 10 AM to 7 PM).
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Indigenous People's Day Special, part 4 (Airplay from 10 AM to 7 PM).
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Indigenous People's Day Special, part 5 (Airplay from 10 AM to 7 PM).
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Indigenous People's Day Special, part 6 (Airplay from 10 AM to 7 PM).
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Harold One Feather is the Primary Researcher for the Rock Creek Community on the Standing Rock Lakota Reservation in north central South Dakota.
 
September 2007 Read September Program Transcripts paper icon
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United Nations' Declaration on The Rights of Indigenous Peoples vote on September 13, 2007; Declaration of Sovereignty of the Confederated Nations of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas; Karen Sussman, President of the International Society for the Protection of Wild Horses.
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August 2007 Read August Program Transcripts paper icon
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With the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on our tribal community, long-term hurricane relief efforts have moved to the forefront of the UHN's strategic plans for the next 3-5 years. The United Houma Nation received funds from various grants and contributions. These donations have greatly impacted the United Houma Nation and its tribal members in our relief efforts.
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July 2007 Read July Program Transcripts paper icon
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June 2007 Read June Program Transcripts paper icon
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May 2007 Read May Program Transcripts paper icon
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"They're Never Going to Get It", Brazil's Indians are Offended by Pope Comments an article by Washington Post Reuters.
  May 8, 2007
The Flying Eagle Woman Fund and the American Indian Community House Presents... John Trudell and Bad Dog
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April 2007 Read April Program Transcripts paper icon
  April 28, 2007
"Maze of Injustice – The Failure to Protect Indigenous Women from Sexual Violence in the USA" Native American and Alaska Native women in the United States suffer disproportionately high levels of rape and sexual violence, yet the federal government has created substantial barriers to accessing justice, according to Amnesty International's 2007 Report.
  April 13, 2007
Wild Horses are starving in South Dakota, a message from Karen A. Sussman, President of ISPMB, asking for donations.
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March 2007 Read March Program Transcripts paper icon
  March 27, 2007
FVIR brings to the airwaves the experiences, perspectives and struggles of Indigenous people who have been almost totally excluded from both mainstream and progressive, alternative media
  March 26, 2007
Tiokasin Ghosthorse performs an evening concert at The New York Open Center
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The Eagle Feather Law: How Religious Freedom in America is Restricted for Native Americans; Indigenous Activists Speak Out On 3,000 Mile Journey to Confront Logging Giant Weyerhaeuser From Their Land.
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February 2007 Read February Program Transcripts paper icon
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Racism in Sports and the Media: Chief Illiniwek May Have Had Last Dance, But Redskins, Braves, Etc. Maintain Hostile Landscape
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Environmental Justice & Indigenous Rights: Battling Climate Change and Protecting Sacred Sites
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January 2007 Read January Program Transcripts
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January 11, 2007
Navajo Blockaders Gain Support for Resistance While Protesting President's Inauguration; San Barred From Ancestral Land Despite Court Victory; Sami Win Rights, Gearing up to Fight for More; Mapuche Indians Meet With Chilean President Bachelet; Alaskan Bristol Bay Opened for Drilling; Disparity in Life Expectancy in Australia; Navajo Blockaders Gain Support for Resistance While Protesting President’s Inauguration; A Look at Mysterious Phenomena and the U.S. Military: the Real X-Files?
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January 4, 2007
Indigenous Rights in the Pacific Basin: Struggling to Stay Afloat Despite Stranglehold of Economic Globalization; An Indigenous Perspective on Climate Justice
 
December 2006 Read December Program Transcripts
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December 28, 2006
Festival of Resistance: Featuring Indigenous Films, Poetry, Crafts & Music; Tribute to John Mohawk: Seneca Scholar and Indigenous Rights Activist Fiji Military Halts All Meetings of Indigenous Chiefsl Navajo Nation Update; Okalahoma Centennial; Festival of Resistance: Indigenous films, Poetry, Crafts & Music; Tribute to John Mohawk: Seneca Scholar and Indigenous Rights Activist

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December 22, 2006
Dine Blockaders Vow Continued Resistance Against New Power Plant; The Skulls & Bones Society: Holocaust Deniers and Cultural Appropriators
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December 14, 2006
How to Hate/Love an Indian: Ojibwe Author David Treuer on Native American Fiction
Native American Fiction: A User’s Manual
Navajo Artist Discusses his Work and NYC American Indian Market

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December 9, 2006
Indigenous Oaxacan Activists Discuss State Crackdown; Nasa Filmmaker on Violence Inflicted on Indigenous Peoples in Colombia; Fiji Tribal Chiefs Refuse to Recognize New Regime; Kamehameha Schools Win in Hawaii; Federal Court Sides with Native American Voters in South Dakota; Elderly Abuse March in Navajo Country Ignored; Tribal Elections on Oglala Sioux Rez Embroiled in Controversy; Indigenous World Uranium Summit; Indigenous Oaxacan Activists Discuss State Crackdown; Nasa Filmmaker on Violence Inflicted on Indigenous Peoples in Colombia

 
November 2006 Read November Program Transcripts
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November 30, 2006
Indigenous Filmmakers from Oaxaca Discuss Human Rights Violations, Social Unrest and Indigenous Demands in Mexico; The Canary Effect: A Documentary on the History of Abuse Against Native Americans
 
September 2006 Read September Program Transcripts
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September 28, 2006
Skull Valley Goshute Tribal Member Blasts New Election Process; Indigenous Nations Hold Summit on U.S.- Mexico Border Policies; The Amistad 2006 Sets Sail: A Commemoration of Slavery and Broken Treaties; Author of “Native New Yorkers” on Algonquin History in Manhattan.
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September 21, 2006
Global Warming Takes a Toll in Alaska, Faith Gemmill Describes the Indigenous Fight Against Big Oil; Taking on the Doctrine of Discovery: Tonya Gonnella Frichner Sets the Record Straight; Neets’aii Gwich’in Describes Global Warming’s Impact in Alaska; Taking on the Doctrine of Discovery: Tonya Gonnella Frichner Sets the Record Straight
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September 14, 2006
Grassy Narrows: Home of the Longest-Standing Indigenous Blockade in Canadian History; Former Prisoner Splitting the Sky on 32nd Anniversary of Attica Prison Rebellion; Pombo's Gaming Bill Struck Down; No Nuclear Waste in Goshute; Tribal Opposition to Federal Nominee; Native Americans Removed from Jury Pool; Grassy Narrows Ojibwe Maintain Blockade to Halt Logging on Indigenous Land; Former Prisoner Splitting the Sky on 32nd Anniversary of Attica Prison Rebellion
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September 7, 2006
The Indigenous Politics of Border Security
 
August 2006 Read August Program Transcripts
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Resisting Waste-Culture and Reducing Toxicity; Native Inupiats Describe Their Harrowing Experience with Oil; and Saving Lake Teshekpuk
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Yaqui Man Defies Tribe and U.S. Border Guard, Provides Aid to Migrants Crossing Border; Former Chief of Neetsaii Gwichi'in Details How Big Oil in Alaska Threatens Sustainability
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Inter-American Indigenous Peoples Draft Treaty Demanding End to 'Doctrine of Discovery'; Oil in Alaska: How Are Indigenous Peoples Affected by BPs Mess?
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Indigenous Border Rights; Summit of Nations at Bear Butte; Mercury Contamination Violates Food Rights
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July 2006 Read July Program Transcripts paper icon
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Protecting Mother Earth: The Battle to Defend Sacred Sites and the Indigenous Youth Movement
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June 2006 Read June Program Transcripts paper icon
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Kickapoo Tribe in Kansas Suffers Water Crisis, Files Lawsuit For Rights to Reservoir Project; Language Teacher Succeeds in Making Lakota Part of High School Curriculum
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Native Americans, Military Service and PTSD; Committee to release results of Abramoff investigation; Former BIA official Reveals former Interior Department deputy secretary Griles as Abramoff's "Point Man."; Racist Cartoon Targets Seminole Tribe; North Dakota: Group Challenges Right to Use "Fighting Siouxs" Mascot ; Six Nations Caledonia Update; Hawaiian School Ruling; Michigan Tribe Seeks Boost in Recognition Struggle
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Penobscot Nation Part of Unique Collaboration to Restore River and Salmon; Montana Coal Wars Veteran Gail Small on Energy Policies, Land Rights, Abramoff and More
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A Debate on the Native Hawaii Recognition Bill; 100 Days: An Update on the Six Nations Standoff in Caledonia; The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Moves Towards Federal Recognition
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Carrie Dann on the Pentagon's Cancelled "Divine Strake" Test Blast; Tohono O'odham Battle Secret Plans to Build a Hazardous Waste Dump Near Ceremonial Land; Winona LaDuke on Food Sovereignty: the New Arena of Colonialism
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May 2006 Read May Program Transcripts paper icon
  May 4, 2006
Bringing Indigenous Issues to the United Nations: Re-defining the Millennium Development Goals; Bolivian Water War Leader Oscar Olivera Collaborates in Film Project, Fundraiser Tonight!
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April 2006 Read April Program Transcripts paper icon
  April 7, 2006
Mohawk Nation Clashes With Canadian Authorities; Lakota Elders Share Wisdom on Issues From Global Warming to Abortion
  April 6, 2006
Western Shoshone Condemn U.S. Nuclear Simulation Plans on Tribal Lands; Biker Bar Threatens to Desecrate Bear Butte; Charon Asetoyer: Candidate for the South Dakota State Senate
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March 2006 Read March Program Transcripts paper icon
  March 30, 2006
Abramoff Scandal's Impact on Indian Country; Native American Author Gabriel Horn on "Contemplations of a Primal Mind"
  March 16, 2006
Oil Pipeline in Peru Ruptures a Fifth Time: How Amazon Indians are Being Burned
  March 9, 2006
Abortion Ban in South Dakota Draws Native Opposition, and Indigenous Peoples' Demands for UN Declaration of Indigenous Rights Continue into 11th Year
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February 2006 Read February Program Transcripts paper icon
  February 7, 2006
Agreement Between Coastal Native Canadian Nations, Loggers and Environmentalists Protects Sacred Forest
  February 2, 2006
Confronting Myths: From the Legend of Pocahontas to the Discourse on Palestine; Louisiana's Coastal Tribes Appeal For Help; Free Speech or Racist Propaganda?: Multi-Faith Coalition Mobilizes to Respond to Anti-Palestinian Ad
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January 2006 Read January Program Transcripts paper icon
  January 26, 2006
Indigenous Environmental Network Director Charges Bush Administration With Crimes Against Humanity; A Discussion With Charmaine Whiteface, Defender of the Black Hills
  January 5, 2006
Burial Ground Threatened, the Abramoff Scandal, Mohawks Under Siege
  January 2, 2006
Homeless for Over a Century, a Tribe Awaits U.S. Redemption
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December 2005 Read December Program Transcripts paper icon
  December 8, 2005
Nevada Tribe Hit by Fire Still Waiting on BIA For Assistance; Lummis Enlist Fire, an Old Ally, As They Battle Scourge of Drugs; AIM Calls for Newspaper Columnist To Be Fired For Criticizing Deloria; Supreme Court Nominee Alito Voted to Support Indian's Religious Freedom; Supreme Court Rules State Can Tax Reservation Fuel, Blow Dealt to the Potawatomi Nation
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November 2005 Read November Program Transcripts paper icon
  November 15, 2005
Vine Deloria Jr. Passes After a Life of Seminal Work
  November 10, 2005
We speak with Angus Hemlock and Lola Forester
  November, 3, 2005
We speak with Renee Gurneau, Jose Barreiro, and Kent Nerburn
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September 2005 Read September Program Transcripts paper icon
  September 1, 2005
Fundraiser: Pro-Choice Movement in Mexico partnering with Zapatistas
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August 2005 Read August Program Transcripts paper icon
  August 25, 2005
Gwitch'in Nation Launches National Campaign to Protect the Arctic Refuge and a Way of Life
  August 18, 2005
News on Colombia from Mario Murillo and Maori Music; New York Station Links to Indigenous Radio Station in Colombia
  August, 13, 2005
Send us news about Indigenous communities and People
  August 11, 2005
South African Government Charged With Ignoring Indigenous Needs; Venezuela Grants Indigenous Land Rights; Bush's Energy Bill: A Strike Against Native Communities; NCAA Bans 18 Racist Mascots; Hawai'i: Occupied Territory Past and Present
  August 9, 2005
The struggle to end the racist practice of using Indian mascots is looked at with the history of the word "Redskins."; Bush's Energy Bill Passes
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May 2005 Read May Program Transcripts paper icon
  May 10, 2005
Ponca v. Carbon Black Company
  May 6, 2005
Navajo Uranium Mining Ban Under Scrutiny
  May 5, 2005
Navajo Nation Council Bans Uranium Mining; On Indians and Patriotism; Congress: Make the streets safe for Indian women too; We speak with Gracie Horne, Tama Waipara, Ataahua Papa, Kent Lebsock, and Mac Suara Kadiwel
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April 2005 Read April Program Transcripts paper icon
  April 24, 2005
Peru Plans Reserve for Isolated Indigenous Group; Brazil Formalizes Indigenous Reserve
  April 21, 2005
Indigenous Environmental Network makes a statement at the 13th session of the Commission on Sustainable Development; Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide
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